Life After Facebook

24 February, 2012 § 5 Comments


NYC - MoMA: Pablo Picasso's Repose

“I’ll be curious to read how your newfound faceboook freedom affects your relationships.” –Alex

It’s been a week since my wife and I have left Facebook… after the foaming at the mouth, and inane babbling subsided, life has proven to be substantially quieter. We received a splendidly intentional email from one of our family members and took our sweet time to craft an equally intentional response.

What can I say? My wife has received more attention, my classes have received more attention, I’ve received more attention–life has moved to from  a grueling, breakneck pace to a steady gander. Yet there is a wonderful sense of productivity in the air.

In all of this I’ve come to realize how few close relationships I posses. Here and now friends were on Facebook. There and then friends were on Facebook. Relative solitude is proving to be lonesome but it has made me to seek God further out  of a desire for conversation.

What now then? First Facebook then the world? Reveling in this quieter state of mind, I am moved to repose, but soon comes the refining process of actually dealing with the troubles that have been swept under the rug by inaction.  It reminds me of that Twenty-One Pilots song Car Radio. Listen to it. It’s obnoxious, but it really puts our busy lives into perspective.   

03/02/12 Promo: Our Busy Lives Considered *Featuring Augustine of Hippo*

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§ 5 Responses to Life After Facebook

  • Well, we’ve missed you. In all your free time maybe you could reconstruct some of your family relationships so we all know we still have a son and brother. 😀

    • Daniel Bacon says:

      That you’ve been intentional is enough for me to know that I still have parents who love me. It goes both ways though, the amount that either of us purposefully contacts one another is the degree of communication that will take place. We don’t need Facebook to continue the conversation of our lives together.

  • Alex says:

    Awesome. Keep it up.
    “Reveling in this quieter state of mind, I am moved to repose, but soon comes the refining process of actually dealing with the troubles that have been swept under the rug by inaction.”
    Totally. That’s what removing the distraction will do. A moment of calm, serenity – eyes open, colors brighten. And it’s a self-perpetuating rediscovery because it’s new. But soon, the vacuum created by its removal is going to need to be filled by something. Here’s to hoping that you can maintain the steady flow of productivity framed by tranquility.

    • Daniel Bacon says:

      The vacuum fills quicker than anyone can guess. It seems as soon as one distraction is removed another quickly forms to take it’s place. Thanks for stopping in.

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