Searching for Good in Good Friday

6 April, 2012 § 4 Comments


 “He (God, the Father) made Him (Jesus, the Son) who knew no sin to be sin on our behalf, so that we might become the righteousness of God in Him.” II Corinthians 5:21

As a child I often wondered why the day that we commemorate the death of Jesus is called “Good Friday”. The truth is that the result of  our rebellion called sin is death (Romans 3:23).

Recently I finished the first in Suzanne Collins‘ series, The Hunger Games, in which a post apocalyptic North American polity commands twelve districts who at one point in history had rebelled against the capital district. The punishment was that once a year each district would offer up a tribute of one boy and one girl between the ages of 12 and 18 to be entered into a televised gladiator event that lasts until the last tribute stands undefeated. The punishment for their rebellion was death.

Pay attention–it is not that far from the truth. God, our creator, who loves us, came into this world in very like circumstance. Man has rebelled and turned his back on the Father. Remember that “At the heart of all sin is the vain ambition of angels  and men to be God and to think, speak, and act accordingly” (Sin | Image Series Part 3). The penalty for man’s rebellion is death.

Consider this passage, for in it’s commandment lies the reason that goodness results because of Jesus’ death.

“5 Have this attitude in yourselves which was also in Christ Jesus, 6 who, although He existed in the form of God, did not regard equality with God a thing to be grasped, 7 but emptied Himself, taking the form of a bond-servant, and being made in the likeness of men. 8 Being found in appearance as a man, He humbled Himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross.” Philippians 2:5-8

Jesus was sinless because He was fully God yet liable to death being fully man. Remember that God is three in one and that every attribute that He has is magnified by infinity. The third member of the infinite trinity came to die as the representation of fallen humanity so that  in his infinite death, death itself was satisfied, and in his infinite life he was raised again and conquered sin and the grave.

Forty days after the Resurrection, Jesus ascended into heaven to sit down at the right hand of the Father to intercede for us. This is why we call it “Good Friday”. Because Jesus made it possible for humanity to be reconciled to God.

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Paul’s Proposed Perspective in Philippians

7 October, 2010 § 1 Comment


Philippians 2:1-6 (NASB) 

“1Therefore if there is any encouragement in Christ, if there is any consolation of love, if there is any (A)fellowship of the Spirit, if any (B)affection and compassion,

 2(C)make my joy complete by (D)being of the same mind, maintaining the same love, united in spirit, intent on one purpose.

 3Do nothing from (E)selfishness or (F)empty conceit, but with humility of mind (G)regard one another as more important than yourselves;

 4(H)do not merely look out for your own personal interests, but also for the interests of others.

 5(I)Have this attitude in yourselves which was also in (J)Christ Jesus,

 6who, although He (K)existed in the (L)form of God, (M)did not regard equality with God a thing to be grasped,”

            Christ’s attitude exemplifies exactly how he expects every human being to act. It can be simplified to the algebraic expression: God > You ≥ Me.
             How have we showed someone else that they are greater than or equal to ourselves? Just a simple on-your-way thought of the day.

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